The Steve Jackson Laboratory Website
Transformative discoveries in genome and cellular integrity

Conferences

Jan
28
to Feb 2

Ubiquitin Signaling, Tahoe City, CA, USA

Scientific Organizers: David Komander and Sylvie Urbé

These are exciting times for ubiquitin research: potential targets for small molecule inhibitors are emerging in a variety of human diseases and being exploited by the pharmaceutical industry. At the same time new enzymes regulating ubiquitin modifications are still being discovered, and the complexity of ubiquitin modifications continues to increase with the emerging cross-talk between post-translational modifications. This meeting will focus on the latest insights in the large area of cellular regulation mediated by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers. Key goals are to provide overviews and updates on emerging frontiers, inform on new developments to understand the complexity, and encourage efforts to exploit the system to provide new treatments for human diseases. Rather than being organized around key enzymes in the cascade, sessions will focus on biological areas, ensuring a balanced mix of mechanistic and physiology aspects. The meeting will feature both key opinion-leaders on ubiquitination who are known to present unpublished results and leading researchers from peripheral fields who will contribute new ideas. A short selection of company-associated academic speakers will provide insights into the translational opportunities in this area.

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Feb
1
to Feb 3

4th EACR Conference: A Matter of Life or Death: From Basic Cell Death Mechanisms to Novel Cancer Treatments, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Evading cell death is a hallmark of cancer cells, which contributes to tumour growth and therapeutic resistance. But cancer cells also highjack mechanisms like protective autophagy or senescence to promote tumour growth. Cell death is an important determinant of the immune response to cancer, which may either increase the antitumour effect or promote tumour growth. The conference will cover exciting new insights into this highly-relevant field

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Feb
5
to Feb 7

Toulouse OncoWeek 2018, Toulouse, France

This symposium is a large and important event that gather scientists and clinicians and aims at presenting an overview of new concepts and studies in the field of oncology.
The program for 2018 will include 6 sessions (Metastasis and microenvironment, Genetic instability and DNA damage, Epigenetics and Non coding genome, Cancer immunotherapy, New therapeutic strategies and Clinical Research).

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Feb
11
to Feb 15

3rd DNA Replication/Repair Structures and Cancer Conference, Cancun, Mexico

  • Fiesta Americana Condesa (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The remarkable stability of the human genome is lost in cancer cells due to the loss of efficient and accurate repair in the context of oncogene-induced replication stress and elevated transcription. DNA replication is furthermore emerging as a surprisingly fragile and complex process requiring fork protection and restart, R-loop resolution, and repair. Unresolved replication and repair intermediates signal apoptosis. The synthetic lethality and essentiality resulting from replication-repair stresses thus suggest repair inhibitors as tools to control pathway selection and damage outcomes and to design advanced therapeutics. The 2018 DNA Replication and Repair Structures & Cancer conference will focus on structural and mechanistic insights into dynamic protein, DNA and RNA complexes acting in DNA replication and repair events relevant to cancer.

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Mar
5
to Mar 8

Genomic Instability and Gene Therapeutics in Neurological Diseases, Cancun, Mexico

With the rapidly emerging new tools including genomics, bioinformatics, metabolomics and proteomic analysis and new powerful editing tools such as CRISPR/CAS9 we are getting closer to more defined understanding of the complex cellular pathways underpinning neurodegeneration, which underlie many debilitating pathological and age-associated neurological demise. This is a great opportunity to assemble a rich programme of international speakers to address the latest advances from basic research to clinical applications in disorders of the central nervous system.

The conference will primarily focus on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Alzheimer’s disease/dementia, and repeat expansion disorders with translational spin focussing on recent advances in gene based-therapeutics.

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Mar
23
to Mar 27

Chromatin Architecture and Chromosome Organization, Whistler, BC, USA

  • Whistler Conference Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Understanding the principles governing genome regulation is one of the major challenges now facing biomedical research in the 21st century. Deciphering structure-activity relationships of the genome and its partners in the context of the cell nucleus is a necessary step for understanding the basis of development and disease, as well as for the elaboration of strategies against particular forms of cancers and genetic disorders. The genome is not a linear molecule of DNA randomly distributed in the nucleus, but exists as a three-dimensional (3D) object, intricately folded and packaged, structured around nuclear bodies and landmarks, acted upon by countless force-generating nano-machines and remodeling factors. With the recent advances that have been made in microscopy, biochemistry and modeling, the time is ripe to fully address the study of the genome in 3D space and time and consider it as a complex, dynamic biological system. Up until recently, many of the scientists involved in chromatin biology and epigenetics would attend meetings dedicated to this topic and would not necessarily interface with scientists using advanced imaging or physical and mathematical modeling approaches. This meeting will bring together some of the world’s leading experts and emerging talents at the interface of these topics to explore chromosome architecture and its dynamic relationship with genome function. Specifically, it will explore: 1) Chromatin structure and how this relates to gene expression and genome functions such as DNA replication and repair; 2) Chromosome conformation and the new insights into genome organization that have emerged using new technologies; 3) The nature of the chromatin partners (proteins, RNAs) that underlie chromatin folding and functions and their dynamic relationships in different contexts (cell cycle, development, environmentally induced changes, etc.); 4) Emerging imaging technologies and microscopy and the answers they are bringing to the dynamics of chromatin and chromosome architecture; and 5) New physical and mathematical modeling approaches to further our understanding of the principles governing chromatin architecture.

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Mar
25
to Mar 30

DNA Damage, Mutation and Cancer, Ventura, CA, USA

The 2018 Gordon Research Conference on DNA Damage, Mutation and Cancer is developed around the theme of exploiting fundamental knowledge to advance treatment and prevention. Rich and ever-increasing information is available on the specific mutations that are the molecular basis of cancer. Many mutations can be traced to specific types of damage to the DNA, while others arise from DNA replication errors or unknown causes. Technologies are being refined to determine the origins of these mutations, and monitor the accuracy and reproducibility of cancer genomic data. Biological and structural analyses can assess which mutations are functionally relevant. Specific mutations can confer vulnerabilities, making individual cancers more responsive to treatment with DNA damaging agents.

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May
6
to May 11

Precision Medicine in Cancer, Stockholm, Sweden

Thanks to next-generation sequencing, we have started to unravel the cancer genomic landscape of several major cancer entities that contributes to the pathogenesis and/or evolution of the disease. For the majority of cancer subtypes, a quite diverse and complex mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes accompanied by a long tail of genes with low-frequency mutations. Some of these genes have already been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic/predictive and even therapeutic impact, while most mutations still require functional validation. In parallel, large efforts have been made to design novel strategies targeting key cellular pathways and processes, which in turn has led to introduction of targeted therapy in selected entities. However, there is still a gap-of-knowledge and urgent medical need how to combine the genetic information with risk-stratification and treatment algorithms in the individual patient, i.e., precision medicine. This symposium will exemplify large sequencing efforts carried out in different cancer types, including both solid tumors and hematological malignancies, which paved the way for the incorporation of next-generation sequencing-based approaches into clinical routine diagnostics and every-day patient care. The conference will encompass the rapidly evolving field of disease monitoring by ultra-sensitive sequencing of tumor-specific mutations, as well as introduce novel approaches and other omics technologies and functional studies that will aid future efforts in precision medicine. Finally, successful examples of how genomic findings have spurred development of targeted therapies will be presented. In summary, the symposium will bring together basic scientists, translational researchers and clinicians to meet and discuss a consorted action towards precision medicine in cancer.

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Jun
30
to Jul 3

25th EACR Biennial Congress, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The theme of the Congress is ‘From Fundamental Insight to Rational Cancer Treatment’, covering the journey of discovery and development ‘from bench to bedside’. The Congress will feature world-class speakers discussing the most innovative current research topics, including a special education track aimed at clinicians. As well as high-profile plenary sessions, the programme offers parallel symposia, allowing participants to build their own scientific programme according to their interests.

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Jul
22
to Jul 27

Gordon Research Conference Genomic Instability, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

  • Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 2018 Genome Instability GRC aims to bring together an outstanding and diverse group of established and younger researchers from North America, Europe and Asia to share their latest research findings on chromosome replication, genome maintenance, and chromatin dynamics.

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Jul
27
2:00 PM14:00

Chromatin Structure and Function, Newry, MA, USA

The Chromatin Structure and Function GRC is one of the longest standing conferences on chromatin, dating back to the 1970s. The meeting covers timely and important topics, including: X-ray crystallization and biophysical studies of individual nucleosomes and higher order structures, the identification and functions of histone post-translational modifications, the regulation and structure of histone modifying enzymes, the components and mechanisms of action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling assemblies, replication-dependent and replication-independent mechanisms of chromatin assembly, nucleosome positioning and phasing, the functions of histone variants, gene silencing in heterochromatin, chromatin remodeling during gene activation and repression in euchromatin, chromatin remodeling during DNA repair and recombination, the importance of heterochromatin organization at centromeres and telomeres to the maintenance of genome integrity. The role of chromatin remodeling factors and histone modifications to large scale organization of chromosomes and the location of loci within the nucleus are also discussed, as is the role of chromatin modifications and DNA methylation in epigenetics, particularly with regards as to how mutations in chromatin remodeling and histone modifying activities affect developmental processes and contribute to human disease.

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Jul
29
to Aug 3

DNA Topoisomerases in Biology and Medicine, South Hadley, MA, USA

The helical nature of the double helix causes a topological problem for its replication. Watson and Crick were well aware of this potential problem, and in 1953 they stated: "Since the two chains in our model are intertwined, it is essential for them to untwist if they are to separate... Although it is difficult at the moment to see how these processes occur without everything getting tangled, we do not feel that this objection will be insuperable." We now know that this problem is solved by the DNA topoisomerases, which were first reported in 1971 by James Wang, with the discovery of bacterial topoisomerase I. Over the past ~40 years these enzymes have been found in all organisms (prokaryotes, eukaryotes, viruses and archaea) and to perform roles that are vital for survival, supporting replication, transcription and other processes where topological problems in DNA need to be resolved. The enzymes are ‘marvelous molecular machines’ catalyzing the seemingly magical task of passing one piece of DNA through another to catalyze changes in DNA topology. Some of the enzymes are molecular motors having the ability to transduce the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into torsional stress in DNA (supercoiling). Although the outline of their mechanisms has been established, a great deal is unknown and emerging technologies, such as single-molecule methods, need to be applied to gain a deeper understanding of these enzymes and their roles in cellular processes. Topoisomerases have also become key drug targets both for anti-bacterial and anti-cancer chemotherapy. This is due to their essential nature and because of their mechanism of action, which involves transient DNA cleavage that, if disrupted, can lead to highly cytotoxic events. Study of these enzymes in the context of myriad cellular processes is of key importance in research leading to the development of new chemotherapeutic agents.

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Nov
15
5:00 PM17:00

Workshop: "Chromosomal Instability: From Molecular Mechanisms to Disease", Baeza, Spain

Current Trends in Biomedicine 2017 workshop on "Chromosomal Instability: From Molecular Mechanisms to Disease"

Organizers:
Pablo Huertas (Andalusian Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine Centre (CABIMER), Sevilla, Spain)
Andres J. López-Contreras (Center for Chromosome Stability (CCS), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)
Guillermo de Cárcer (Spanish National Cancer Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain)

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Nov
10
2:00 PM14:00

London Chromatin Meeting, London UK

Come and participate in this free half day meeting, present your research and hear about the latest developments in the field of chromatin biology.      

The London Chromatin Meeting is a series of meetings which provide a forum for scientists (especially students and young postdocs) to present their work and for attendees to network in a relaxed and friendly environmen.

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Oct
29
to Nov 1

Protecting the code - Epigenetic impacts on genome stability

The maintenance of genome stability takes place in a chromatin environment, and it is increasingly evident that epigenetic regulation is a key component of genome stability. Notably, epigenetic pathways are frequently perturbed in cancer cells. Understanding the interplay between epigenetic regulation and genome stability at a molecular level is critical to cancer biology and has important translational implications. 

The programme will address the challenges of understanding this complex field and will emphasise new experimental systems for interrogating these pathways. While the emphasis is on understanding molecular mechanisms of epigenetic impacts on genome stability, we will also consider how recent advances can be exploited in the clinic. 

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Oct
23
9:30 AM09:30

Cambridge International Rare DIsease Summit

This year’s Summit revolves around “Re-imagining the Patient Journey”, seeking to create a forum that brings together all rare disease stakeholders in a spirit of collaboration, innovation and passion to re-imagine and re-invent the rare disease patient journey.

We have listened closely to the excellent feedback from delegates in 2016 to bring more powerful patient stories, tracing the journey from early symptoms through their odyssey to diagnosis and their successful patient group, clinician and pharma collaborations leading to clinical trials and hope for future treatment pathways.

Anchored by powerful patient voices, this one-day conference will explore:

  • Rare disease patient journeys from symptoms through to treatment
  • Empowering the patient revolution
  • Data mining and management
  • Pharma 'adopting' a rare disease
  • Drug re-purposing and matching
  • Gene therapy
  • Local rare disease research and projects
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Oct
17
to Oct 18

The CRISPR FORUM: CRISPR gene editing - Drug discovery tool or therapeutic revolution?

The discovery of the RNA programmable nucleases Cas9 and Cpf1 has greatly facilitated genome editing. The impact of CRISPR technology has been universal, bringing drug discovery to an era of whole genome knockout screens and widely distributed multiplexed in vivo gene editing experiments, as well as moving into the clinic to join ZFN and TALEN powered therapies progressing towards registration.

This unique meeting, being held in Dublin, will bring leaders in the field of gene editing together with a wide academic and commercial audience, to explore the new horizons in drug development and therapeutics brought by advancements in CRISPR technology.

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Oct
8
to Oct 11

2nd Meeting on the Molecular Biology of Ageing

  • Groningen The Netherlands (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

We have succeeded to gather world-leading scientists working in the diverse research areas that are relevant for understanding the biology of ageing. The meeting will begin on October 8th with an Opening Lecture by Professor Andrew Dillon,  Thomas and Stacey Siebel Distinguished Chair in Stem Cell Research at the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at Berkeley.

The programme of the Meeting is organized into 10 sessions covering a wide range of topics related with the process of ageing.

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Oct
4
to Oct 8

Nuclear structure and dynamics

  • L'Isle sur la Sorgue France (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This EMBO Conference will cover chromosome structure and organization, epigenetic modifications, chromatin remodelling and reprogramming, silent chromatin, genome stability and telomere biology, replication and repair, nuclear RNA, systems biology of genome functions and nuclear compartments.

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Oct
2
to Oct 6

4th EMBO Conference: DNA Damage Responses in Cell Physiology and Disease

The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex signaling network including cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair and DNA-damage tolerance pathways. The DDR is affected by, and impacts on, many cellular components and processes, including chromatin structure, DNA replication, transcription and cell cycle progression. Failure to properly respond to DNA damage leads to genomic instability, an underlining cause of various human syndromes and also associated with many age-related diseases, particularly cancer. Notably, it is becoming clear that the DDR is an attractive therapeutic target for cancer and other disease areas. This EMBO Conference will cover all the above topics in ways that will link detailed molecular mechanisms of the DDR and associated processes to human ageing, disease and therapeutic applications.

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Sep
27
to Sep 30

IARC 2017

The 2nd International Ataxia Research Conference will be held on September 27-30, 2017 in Pisa, Italy. The focus of the meeting is a comprehensive scientific review of new research from disease definition to therapeutic treatments. The conference will include Friedreich’s ataxia and other recessive ataxias (eg: ataxia with oculomotor apraxia), dominant ataxias (eg: spinocerebellar ataxias, DRPLA, episodic ataxias) and autoimmune ataxias.

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Sep
26
to Sep 27

Genomic Medicine 2017

The scientific theme for this meeting like most Biotexcel meetings will cover the areas where Next Generation Sequencing is used in the analysis of human disease.  These topics will include different disease areas where particularly promising genomic studies have been performed; large population studies such as the East London Genes & health project; whole genome & whole exome studies; epigenomics and many other topics.  In this meeting we will also hear from commercial genomic companies, whether those that currently have genomic solutions on the market, or those that are spin-outs or in the research or earlier phases, as well as hearing from Illumina’s Chief Scientist David Bentley.

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Sep
25
to Sep 27

3rd International Cancer Symposium

  • Convention Centre of Lyon (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The meeting aims to gather scientists and clinicians interested in cancer biology and its therapeutic innovations, and to present the latest scientific advances in these fields.
Through the participation of internationally renowned scientists, the Symposium aims to address crucial questions about the fundamental issues of cancer biology with a special emphasis on interactions between basic, clinical and translational research.

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Sep
24
to Sep 26

1st Crick International Cancer Conference

  • The Francis Crick Institute (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 1st Crick International Cancer Conference will bring together leading cancer scientists from all over the world to discuss the latest findings in cancer metabolism, the tumour microenvironment, and how the cancer genotype changes over time. In addition to a line-up of world leading speakers, there will be many opportunities for early stage researchers to present short talks and posters.

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Sep
15
to Sep 19

Ubiquitin and SUMO: From molecular mechanisms to system-wide responses

Post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin and ubiquitin related modifiers such as SUMO is one of the most commonly used regulatory mechanisms in cells. The purpose of this conference is to accelerate education and understanding of ubiquitin, SUMO and other Ubls at molecular, cellular and organismal levels and thus facilitate discovery as well as medical or biotechnological translation.

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Sep
6
to Sep 8

Histone variants: Molecular functions in health and disease

  • BioMedical Center (BMC) Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This EMBO Workshop features histone variants, which are part of an interconnected "epigenetic" network including DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, chromatin remodeling, regulatory RNAs and nuclear organization. Worldwide research on histone variants over the last years has revealed their important function in gene regulation, cell cycle progression, DNA damage repair, genome stability, cell differentiation and organism development. Additionally, recent studies have highlighted the role of mutations or deregulation of expression of histone variants and their binding partners in diverse diseases, most notably cancer.

This EMBO Workshop will provide a comprehensive representation of all of these histone variant-related processes, with a balanced portrayal of different model organisms, including rare variants in parasites and evolutionary aspects, as well as presentations of the different variant families, such as linker histone variants. Specialists of variant deposition mechanisms, chromatin structure and interaction networks, will meet with biochemists focusing on chemical modifications, as well as developmental biologists, bioinformaticians and physiologists to share common interest in histone variants in parasites, yeast, insects, plants and mammals.

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Sep
5
to Sep 9

Eukaryotic DNA Replication & Genome Maintenance

  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Topics:

Replication initiation factors and origins
Replication timing, chromatin, and development
Replisomes and replication fork progression
Replication fork stalling and replication stress
Coordination of replication with cell cycle and transcription
Response to DNA damage
Genome instability & mutagenesis
Telomeres, diseases and cancer

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Jul
23
to Jul 28

Helicases and nucleic acid-based machines: Structure, mechanism and regulation and roles in human disease

  • Kloster Banz Conference Centre (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Helicases and nucleic-acid based machines are involved in all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. Their malfunction is frequently associated with human disease.

In the past, research on helicases mainly focused on the mechanism of individual enzymes. Recent developments such as the identification of target sites and interaction partners on a genome-wide level, and advances in structural biology and single molecule imaging in vitro and in vivo with increasing resolution, now increasingly allow to understand the regulation of helicase function within large complexes and regulatory networks in their natural environment.

Since 1999 this biannual meeting has developed our understanding of helicases and nucleic acid-based machines. This year’s meeting puts a strong focus on new emerging topics, including recent technological developments, new genome wide screening approaches, molecular interactions and single molecule techniques.

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Jul
3
to Jul 6

2nd DNA Replication as a Source of DNA Damage Conference

The maintenance of genome integrity is critical for the suppression of cancer and premature ageing. Only recently has it become appreciated that DNA replication stress is a crucial driver of genomic instability. The timely progression of replisomes can be disrupted by lesions and secondary structures in the template, by bound proteins and by conflicts with the transcription machinery. A prolonged pause of the replisome then exposes single stranded DNA, which, due to its recombinogenic nature, can lead to genome rearrangements, fragile site expression and cell death. Importantly, some cancers present excessive endogenous levels of replication stress, which can be exploited for their clearance. In this conference, we aim to bring together scientists studying DNA replication and repair, with those interested in how DNA damage can influence cancer and ageing.

Key Sessions

  • Pathways for repair of damaged replication forks
  • Systems for site-specific perturbation of replication
  • Chromosome fragility caused by difficult-to-replicate loci – sources and roles of DNA repair proteins
  • Replication perturbation as a driver of tumorigenesis and ageing
  • Exploitation of replication defects in cancer treatment
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Jun
27
2:00 PM14:00

London Cell Cycle Club

Our aims:
* Encourage plenty of discussions in a relaxed atmosphere.
* Inspire new collaborations and investigations.
* Provide a unique opportunity for students and post-docs to participate and present new and excited unpublished data.
 
What we provide:
* Four talks on exciting new research in the cell cycle field
* A one-hour seminar from a leader in the field; Steve West
* Coffee and tea break to socialize between talks
* Drinks and snacks to network after the meeting

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