The Steve Jackson Laboratory Website
Transformative discoveries in genome and cellular integrity

Publications

Targeting of NAT10 enhances healthspan in a mouse model of human accelerated aging syndrome

Balmus G, Larrieu D, Barros AC, Collins C, Abrudan M, Demir M, Geisler NJ, Lelliott CJ, White JK, Karp NA, Atkinson J, Kirton A, Jacobsen M, Clift D, Rodriguez R, Sanger Mouse Genetics Project, Adams DJ, Jackson SP.
Nature Communications (2018) 27 April [Epub ahead of print]

Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, but devastating genetic disease characterized by segmental premature aging, with cardiovascular disease being the main cause of death. Cells from HGPS patients accumulate progerin, a permanently farnesylated, toxic form of Lamin A, disrupting the nuclear shape and chromatin organization, leading to DNA-damage accumulation and senescence. Therapeutic approaches targeting farnesylation or aiming to reduce progerin levels have provided only partial health improvements. Recently, we identified Remodelin, a small-molecule agent that leads to amelioration of HGPS cellular defects through inhibition of the enzyme N-acetyltransferase 10 (NAT10). Here, we show the preclinical data demonstrating that targeting NAT10 in vivo, either via chemical inhibition or genetic depletion, significantly enhances the healthspan in a LmnaG609G HGPS mouse model. Collectively, the data provided here highlights NAT10 as a potential therapeutic target for HGPS.

Kate Dry