The Steve Jackson Laboratory Website
Transformative discoveries in genome and cellular integrity

Conferences

Sep
23
to Sep 26

The DNA Polymerases Meeting, Leiden, The Netherlands

We aim to bring together, in an informal atmosphere, an outstanding and diverse group of scientists working at the forefront of this field. The meeting sessions will cover all relevant aspects of DNA polymerases, including their structure and biochemistry, their genetics, their roles in mutagenesis, fitness and pathologies as well as their applications to molecular biology and medicine.  With the goal of stimulating cross-fertilization we are also inviting a number of speakers from fields related to the DNA polymerase field. 

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Sep
30
to Oct 4

Protein Signaling - from pathways to networks, Copenhagen, Denmark

Protein signaling is the cells most important regulatory mechanism to appropriately respond to internal and external cues. This is afforded by a wealth of posttranslational modifications, which expands the functional diversity of the human proteome by several orders of magnitude. Most therapeutic drugs are directed against proteins, or are proteins themselves, and protein-related technologies promise to revolutionize our understanding of the complex wiring of biological systems. This meeting will bring together world-leading researchers in the area of protein signaling with a focus on protein-driven mechanisms that are relevant to physiology and disease. The meeting will also have a strong emphasis on the emerging single cell and single-molecule technologies as well as on the advances in proteomics, network biology and structural biology. Finally, an important focus will be bridging fundamental discoveries to clinical relevant applications.

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Oct
10
to Oct 13

RNA and genome maintenance: Cooperation and conflict management, Mainz, Germany

  • Institute of Molecular Biology gGmbH (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Genomes of living organisms are exposed to damage arising from different sources. To maintain genome integrity, cells and organisms have evolved elaborate mechanisms and signaling pathways that regulate different processes including DNA repair and cell cycle. Recent findings highlighted the intricate interplay between genome stability maintenance and RNA metabolism: Transcription can interfere with DNA replication and thus pose a serious threat to genome stability. Conversely, DNA damage activates signaling pathways that globally affect transcription, splicing and RNA stability. Moreover, non-coding RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an integral part in DNA repair and DNA damage response. This EMBO Workshop will gather established scientists and junior researchers that study the mutual interactions between the DNA damage response and RNA metabolism. The workshop will provide a forum for open and inspiring discussions between the scientists that shaped and the ones that recently joined this exciting and rapidly progressing field on the following topics:

  • Replication-transcription conflicts and transcription-associated DNA damage
  • RNA-binding proteins in genome stability maintenance
  • Non-coding RNA in the DNA damage response
  • Interplay between the DNA damage response and RNA metabolism
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Nov
4
to Nov 6

2018 NCRI Cancer Conference, Glasgow, UK

The NCRI Cancer Conference is the UK’s largest forum showcasing the latest advances in cancer research. The Conference provides a platform for researchers, clinicians, people affected by cancer and industry representatives to come together to discuss, present and showcase high-quality research. Informative and interactive educational sessions attract over 1,500 delegates each year and create the ideal setting to establish new collaborations with key stakeholders in cancer research.

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Nov
11
to Nov 15

From Rare to Care: Discovery, Modeling and Translation of Rare Diseases, Vienna, Austria

Work over the past 30 years has resulted in the identification of genes for ~50% of the estimated 7,000 rare genetic diseases; it is predicted that most of the remaining disease genes will be identified in the next 10 years. Approximately 500 medicinal products are currently on the market for rare diseases. The accelerating pace of rare disease gene identification means, in effect, an almost commensurate increase in molecularly defined, readily diagnosable, but nonetheless poorly understood and untreatable, diseases. This meeting will examine the current and future bottlenecks to gene discovery, disease modeling, and therapeutic approaches and suggest strategies to enable progress in this regard. Ultimately, successful deployment of precision medicine for rare diseases will inform such approaches more broadly.

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Nov
22
to Nov 23

Young Life Scientists’ Symposium "Genome Integrity: a Lifetime's Challenge", Montpellier, France

  • Campus Arnaud de Villeneuve (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Young Life Scientists’ Symposia (YLS) are one day scientific conferences supported by the Biochemical Society and organized by PhD students and post-docs for their peers. These events promote networking and professional development through social events and careers sessions, as well as scientific talks and poster sessions.

The symposium focuses on the cellular processes that take place at the level of the genetic material, from the generation of gametes to the development of a mature organism and its decline. The symposium’s scientific programme is organised into three sessions of talks and two poster sessions under the general theme of “Genome Integrity: a lifetime's challenge”.

Session 1: Genome transmission: getting prepared for life
Session 2 : Cellular processes: coordinating life
Session 3 : Ageing and Disease: staying alive
Inspirational Talks : A life dedicated to science

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Jan
13
to Jan 18

DNA Replication and Genome Instability: From Mechanism to Disease, Snowbird, Utah, USA

This meeting will bring together scientists studying the most fundamental aspects of DNA replication and recombination, the organization and regulation of these processes at the cellular and molecular level, and their links to human disease. The aim is to disseminate the latest progress in this area; provide young scientists with the opportunity to present their work in a short talk or poster format; discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing basic research knowledge for the treatment of disease, and discuss the relevance of emerging work in other fields to genome instability and replication stress. Through talks and specialized workshops led by leaders in the field, the meeting will cover single-molecule to cellular and genome-level studies, providing an integrated view of the relationship between DNA replication, recombination and genome instability.

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Feb
13
to Feb 16

6th Nucleic Acids Conference, Nassau, Bahamas

This meeting is a continuation of the Zing Conferences Nucleic Acids series.

The key role of nucleic acids is to encode and process genetic information at a molecular level. DNA is the genetic library of the cell, while RNA transports, translates and controls the expression of that information. DNA must be copied with unprecedented accuracy once every cell cycle. It is under constant endogenous and environmental onslaught, and a variety of repair pathways are necessary to maintain the integrity of the genetic blueprint. DNA is the only cellular molecule for which repair occurs to a significant extent. DNA undergoes recombination, a kind of molecular cut and re-join that creates diversity to facilitate evolution, as well as providing an important repair pathway. In eukaryotes something like 2m DNA is packaged into chromosomes so that it packs into the cell nucleus with a diameter of just 6 µm, while remaining accessible to the cellular machinery that reads out its genetic information. 

RNA is the dynamic worker bee of genetics to the DNA's queen, and an extremely versatile molecule. In the central dogma RNA is the messenger (mRNA) and translators (tRNA) that passes the information between the DNA genome and the protein synthesis machinery, yet it does much, much more. In translation of the genetic information it forms the architectural framework and catalytic center of the ribosome. In eukaryotic cells the pre-mRNA must be processed by the precise removal of intervening sequences (introns), carried out by a large and dynamic RNA-protein machine called the spliceosome. Increasingly we realize that RNA is also involved in critical and complex regulatory processes. RNA can act as a molecular switch responding to small molecules in order to control gene expression. Indeed while most of the genomic DNA does not encode proteins, almost all of it is transcribed into RNA. We are only just beginning the long journey of understanding what all this non-coding RNA is doing - it is very much the 'dark matter' of biology ! Lastly RNA can also accelerate chemical reactions by a million fold or more in the manner of an enzyme. This is very likely of key significance in the origin of life on the planet more than three billion years ago.

Understanding processes involving DNA and RNA at the molecular and chemical level is the central theme of this conference, with a marked structural and mechanistic perspective. The meeting will provide a platform for researchers to discover and discuss the latest advances in the field of nucleic acids, DNA and RNA, with exciting opportunities to share and receive feedback on unpublished data.

Discussion topics will include;

  • DNA replication
  • DNA repair
  • DNA recombination
  • RNA structure and function
  • Translation and the ribosome
  • Silencing
  • CRISPR/Cas and genome editing
  • Gene regulation and riboswitches
  • RNA catalysis
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Feb
23
to Feb 26

3rd Exploring DNA Repair Pathways as Targets for Cancer Therapy Conference, Nassau, Bahamas

Defect in DNA damage repair and checkpoint control is the underlying mechanism for tumorigenesis, since it allows the accumulation of multiple genetic alternations, which are essential for the initiation of tumorigenesis. This has been clearly illustrated to be the cause of several human cancer-prone syndromes and also revealed by recent human genome studies. On the other hand, defective DNA repair and checkpoint activation also make cancer cells more vulnerable for particular DNA damaging agents or inhibitors that specifically disrupt some of these checkpoint pathways. With the increasing understanding of defects in DNA repair and checkpoint control in tumorigenesis, there are extensive interests in exploring these deficiencies, especially taking advantage of the synthetic lethality concept and targeting particular DNA repair and checkpoint pathways for cancer therapy. The purpose of this conference is to bring together basic, translational and clinical investigators and discuss the current and future directions, opportunities and obstacles in the development of these anti-cancer modalities and how to best apply these concepts in clinical practice.

  • Key Sessions
  • Highlight recent advances in the field of DNA damage repair
  • Identify novel targets in DNA repair and checkpoint pathways
  • Explore the concept of synthetic lethality for cancer treatment
  • Assess the therapeutic potential of new anti-cancer modalities
  • Learn mechanisms of therapeutic resistance and ways to improve cancer therapy
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Apr
3
to Apr 4

2019 Research and Innovation ELRIG Conference, Cambridge, UK

The overall meeting focus for 2019 will be "innovations for the future of drug discovery" comprising the following four main sessions:

  1. Innovating the future of rationale drug design
  2. Where are new drug target hypotheses coming from?
  3. Therapeutic approaches of the future
  4. Next generation in vitro models for drug efficiency & safety

This meeting is organised by ELRIG, European Laboratory Research and Innovation Group

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May
1
to May 4

EMBO Workshop Chromatin and Epigenetics, Heidelberg, Germany

Epigenetics refers to heritable change in gene expression that does not involve changes to the underlying DNA sequence. At least three systems including DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) are considered to play fundamental roles in epigenetic regulation. Research over the last two decades has uncovered the role of epigenetics in a variety of human disorders and fatal diseases. Moreover influence of age, environment, lifestyle, and disease state on epigenetic states is being increasingly appreciated and actively studied.

This conference provides an international forum for cutting edge research in chromatin and epigenetics. It provides the "focal hub” for people to present their research and exchange ideas in a European venue. Renowned speakers will cover the latest advances in the field, including chromatin regulation, chromatin dynamics, signalling to chromatin, nuclear architecture and dynamics, developmental epigenetics, epigenomics, epigenetics and human diseases, genome stability, environmental epigenetics, and transgenerational inheritance.

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Sep
17
to Sep 21

EMBO Workshop "DNA Replication, Chromosome Segregation and Fate Decisions", Kyllini, Greece

Bringing together scientists working with eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and employing interdisciplinary methodological approaches, this EMBO Workhshop aims to decipher the common pathways which ensure genome maintenance during the cell division cycle of all organisms and how they may affect cell fate choices.

Topics will include:

  • Replication origins
  • Replisome structure and function
  • Replication-transcription collisions and arrested forks
  • Replication timing
  • DNA and chromosome dynamics
  • 3D nuclear organization, chromatin structure and epigenetic regulation
  • Chromosome condensation and cohesion
  • Chromosome segregation mechanisms and regulation
  • Coordination of replication and segregation
  • Links with cell fate choices
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Sep
6
to Sep 8

Jena Ageing Meeting, Jena, Germany

  • Friedrich Schiller University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Aging is the single biggest risk factor for the development of organ dysfunction and diseases. Even though under debate, there is a strong association between stem division rates and declines in stem cell function possibly impinging on the selection of mutant stem cells in aging, impairments in tissue maintenance and disease development. There are several new therapeutic targets and basic concepts on the causes and consequences of stem cell and organism aging that will be discussed at this meeting.

Principal themes and objectives of the meeting

A unifying theme of this meeting will be the interaction of researchers that study basic principles of stem cell and tissue maintenance in aging. The meeting will focus on basic molecular and genetic processes that affect genetic and epigenetic stability, protein homeostasis, and metabolic processes thereby impairing the functionality and self renewal of stem cells, and organ maintenance.

The meeting will focus on basic mechanisms as well as innovative animal models and humanized models of aging. In addition, there will be fields such as stem cell niches and circulatory factors, developmental biology, cell plasticity, and clonal dominance. These processes all have tremendous impact on our understanding of organism aging.

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Sep
5
to Sep 8

Principles of Chromosome Structure and Function, EMBL Heidelberg, Germany

Topics

  • Chromosome dynamics
  • Nuclear architecture
  • DNA transcription, replication and segregation
  • Hi-C and polymer modelling
  • Molecular mechanisms
  • Structural and functional imaging approaches
  • Genome integrity
  • Chromatin

Why attend?

This interdisciplinary symposium will highlight exciting new insights into the molecular principles that govern the functional framework of genomes in space and time. The meeting program will cover all levels of organisational complexity, from DNA to chromosomes, and in model systems ranging from bacteria to humans. A particular highlight will be the integration of discoveries made in different disciplines, including cell and molecular biology, biophysics, modelling, structural biology and biochemistry.

Aims

This symposium aims to bring together scientists from different disciplines working at the forefront of chromosome biology to discuss the most recent advances in the field. By combining efforts from biology, physics and chemistry, the programme will open new horizons for future research in this exciting area of the life sciences.

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Jul
29
to Aug 3

DNA Topoisomerases in Biology and Medicine, South Hadley, MA, USA

The helical nature of the double helix causes a topological problem for its replication. Watson and Crick were well aware of this potential problem, and in 1953 they stated: "Since the two chains in our model are intertwined, it is essential for them to untwist if they are to separate... Although it is difficult at the moment to see how these processes occur without everything getting tangled, we do not feel that this objection will be insuperable." We now know that this problem is solved by the DNA topoisomerases, which were first reported in 1971 by James Wang, with the discovery of bacterial topoisomerase I. Over the past ~40 years these enzymes have been found in all organisms (prokaryotes, eukaryotes, viruses and archaea) and to perform roles that are vital for survival, supporting replication, transcription and other processes where topological problems in DNA need to be resolved. The enzymes are ‘marvelous molecular machines’ catalyzing the seemingly magical task of passing one piece of DNA through another to catalyze changes in DNA topology. Some of the enzymes are molecular motors having the ability to transduce the free energy of ATP hydrolysis into torsional stress in DNA (supercoiling). Although the outline of their mechanisms has been established, a great deal is unknown and emerging technologies, such as single-molecule methods, need to be applied to gain a deeper understanding of these enzymes and their roles in cellular processes. Topoisomerases have also become key drug targets both for anti-bacterial and anti-cancer chemotherapy. This is due to their essential nature and because of their mechanism of action, which involves transient DNA cleavage that, if disrupted, can lead to highly cytotoxic events. Study of these enzymes in the context of myriad cellular processes is of key importance in research leading to the development of new chemotherapeutic agents.

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Jul
27
2:00 PM14:00

Chromatin Structure and Function, Newry, MA, USA

The Chromatin Structure and Function GRC is one of the longest standing conferences on chromatin, dating back to the 1970s. The meeting covers timely and important topics, including: X-ray crystallization and biophysical studies of individual nucleosomes and higher order structures, the identification and functions of histone post-translational modifications, the regulation and structure of histone modifying enzymes, the components and mechanisms of action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling assemblies, replication-dependent and replication-independent mechanisms of chromatin assembly, nucleosome positioning and phasing, the functions of histone variants, gene silencing in heterochromatin, chromatin remodeling during gene activation and repression in euchromatin, chromatin remodeling during DNA repair and recombination, the importance of heterochromatin organization at centromeres and telomeres to the maintenance of genome integrity. The role of chromatin remodeling factors and histone modifications to large scale organization of chromosomes and the location of loci within the nucleus are also discussed, as is the role of chromatin modifications and DNA methylation in epigenetics, particularly with regards as to how mutations in chromatin remodeling and histone modifying activities affect developmental processes and contribute to human disease.

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Jul
22
to Jul 27

Gordon Research Conference Genomic Instability, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

  • Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 2018 Genome Instability GRC aims to bring together an outstanding and diverse group of established and younger researchers from North America, Europe and Asia to share their latest research findings on chromosome replication, genome maintenance, and chromatin dynamics.

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Jun
30
to Jul 3

25th EACR Biennial Congress, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The theme of the Congress is ‘From Fundamental Insight to Rational Cancer Treatment’, covering the journey of discovery and development ‘from bench to bedside’. The Congress will feature world-class speakers discussing the most innovative current research topics, including a special education track aimed at clinicians. As well as high-profile plenary sessions, the programme offers parallel symposia, allowing participants to build their own scientific programme according to their interests.

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Jun
28
2:30 PM14:30

Medicine at the Crick, London, UK

Our new 'Medicine at the Crick' event, "Gene and gene-editing therapy: A new challenge and opportunity in Clinical Medicine" aims to showcase major advances in biomedical science and raise awareness of the medical implications of major scientific advances amongst the Crick and wider UK biomedical community.
 
The format is a series of short talks, followed by a keynote lecture and a panel discussion. We chose the theme of gene therapy and gene editing to launch the series. The event will be led by Professor Robin Lovell-Badge from the Crick and the keynote lecture will be given by Professor Matthew Porteus from Stanford University. Other speakers and panellists include Dr Claire Booth (UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health), Professor Sarah Tabrizi (UCL Institute of Neurology), Dr Sarah Chan (University of Edinburgh) and Nick Meade (Genetic Alliance UK).

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Jun
24
to Jun 29

FASEB Conference "Machines on Genes", Snowmass, Colorado, USA

This FASEB SRC will unite scientists pushing the boundaries of our molecular understanding of the nucleic acid transactions which facilitate life. Information encoded in RNA and DNA is accessed, maintained, decoded and degraded by a staggering number of proteins, protein/DNA and protein/RNA complexes that catalyze specific fundamental enzymatic reactions which drive nucleic acid transactions— not limited to, but including key cellular processes such as DNA replication and repair, recombination, transposition, transcription, translation and epigenetic gene regulation. These protein and RNA machines are impacted in varying disease states, and can be exploited for therapeutic advantage including using CRIPSR gene editing technologies. The use of emerging biophysical methodologies such as single-molecule spectroscopy/microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, cryo electron microscopy, and chemical biology has opened new doors to exploration of nucleic acid metabolism. This meeting will highlight exciting efforts underway to decipher the anatomy, architecture and mechanisms of these protein and protein-nucleic acid machines in order to understand how they recognize, engage, and manipulate the structure of DNA and RNA...

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Jun
24
to Jun 29

Gordon Research Conference: Mechanisms of Intrinsic and Induced Genome Instability, Newry, ME, USA

  • Grand Summit Hotel at Sunday River Newry (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 2018 Gordon Research Conference on Mutagenesis will focus on the causes and consequences of mutagenesis, addressing topics ranging from the fundamental molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis through the roles of mutagenesis in biology and disease to the exploitation of mutagenesis and mutagenic mechanisms for therapy.

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Jun
6
to Jun 7

The CRISPR Forum 2018, Boston, MA, USA

  • The Lighthouse, CIC Boston (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The 2nd annual CRISPR Forum, organized by Horizon Discovery, will explore the trends and latest developments in applying gene editing technologies in drug discovery, translational research and therapeutics.

This two day meeting is dedicated to bringing together thought-leaders and industry experts, in a relaxed and friendly environment, to share insights and discuss strategies for overcoming challenges in leveraging innovations for main-stream application.

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Jun
3
to Jun 7

EMBO Workshop "Chromatin dynamics and nuclear organization in genome maintenance", Illkirch, France

Maintenance of genome integrity lies at the heart of cell homeostasis. While DNA repair mechanisms have received significant attention for more than half a century, the contribution of the chromatin environment and nuclear organization to genome maintenance has only begun to emerge over the past decade. It is evident that chromatin, being the actual substrate for repair machineries, is heavily remodeled following damage detection and exerts a key function in both targeting and regulating repair at different genomic loci.

This EMBO Workshop brings together an outstanding group of scientists from around the world, young researchers as well as leaders in the field, to cover the following, emerging topics in chromatin, nuclear organization and genome maintenance (i) DNA repair in distinct nuclear domains, (ii) chromatin motion in response to DNA damage, (iii) histone modifications and nucleosome dynamics following DNA damage and (iv) regulatory functions of transcription and RNA during DNA repair and replication stress.

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May
28
to Jun 1

2nd Course on Genome Instability & Human Disease, Institut Curie, Paris, France

Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer cells but also a cause of genetic diseases in humans. Our understanding of the causal relationships between genome instability and the development of human diseases rely on our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of DNA metabolism, including spatial genome organization to genome expression and regulation during development or in response to environmental stress.
The dysfunctions of basic mechanisms linked to genome metabolism underlie human diseases including cancer.

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May
6
to May 11

Precision Medicine in Cancer, Stockholm, Sweden

Thanks to next-generation sequencing, we have started to unravel the cancer genomic landscape of several major cancer entities that contributes to the pathogenesis and/or evolution of the disease. For the majority of cancer subtypes, a quite diverse and complex mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes accompanied by a long tail of genes with low-frequency mutations. Some of these genes have already been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic/predictive and even therapeutic impact, while most mutations still require functional validation. In parallel, large efforts have been made to design novel strategies targeting key cellular pathways and processes, which in turn has led to introduction of targeted therapy in selected entities. However, there is still a gap-of-knowledge and urgent medical need how to combine the genetic information with risk-stratification and treatment algorithms in the individual patient, i.e., precision medicine. This symposium will exemplify large sequencing efforts carried out in different cancer types, including both solid tumors and hematological malignancies, which paved the way for the incorporation of next-generation sequencing-based approaches into clinical routine diagnostics and every-day patient care. The conference will encompass the rapidly evolving field of disease monitoring by ultra-sensitive sequencing of tumor-specific mutations, as well as introduce novel approaches and other omics technologies and functional studies that will aid future efforts in precision medicine. Finally, successful examples of how genomic findings have spurred development of targeted therapies will be presented. In summary, the symposium will bring together basic scientists, translational researchers and clinicians to meet and discuss a consorted action towards precision medicine in cancer.

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May
1
to May 6

EMBO Workshop "Telomere biology in health and disease", Troia, Portugal

This EMBO Workshop will focus on the molecular mechanisms of telomere biology and how this is compromised in human genetic disorders, ageing and cancer. This reflects exciting recent developments in the field linking shelterin and telomerase pathway mutations to a range of human diseases.

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Apr
20
8:30 AM08:30

Postdoc Symposium "The Journey from Genes to Disease", Oxford, UK

As postdocs we are under increasing pressure to succeed, and facing the challenge to move on to tenured employment can lead us down many diverse paths. In order to have a competitive advantage we need to build networks with other researchers within and increasingly outwith our chosen field of research.

The Journey from Genes to Disease is a free one day symposium, held in central Oxford and organised by the Postdoctoral Training Fellows at MRC Harwell Institute. The theme is the influence of genetics and genetic regulation in modelling human disease – from molecular through cellular to whole animal level and encompassing developmental, environmental and behavioural interactions.

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Apr
3
to Apr 6

The PARP Family and ADP-ribosylation CSHL Meeting, NY, USA

  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This meeting will bring together researchers from disparate areas with a common interest in PARPs and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Sessions will include:

  • Mono(ADP-ribosyl) Transferases and Cellular Signaling
  • DNA Repair, Genome Instability, Cancer, and Aging
  • PARPs in the Nucleus and Signaling
  • Chemical Biology and Proteomics
  • Structure and Mechanisms
  • NAD+ metabolism, Inhibitors, and Analogs
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Mar
25
to Mar 30

DNA Damage, Mutation and Cancer, Ventura, CA, USA

The 2018 Gordon Research Conference on DNA Damage, Mutation and Cancer is developed around the theme of exploiting fundamental knowledge to advance treatment and prevention. Rich and ever-increasing information is available on the specific mutations that are the molecular basis of cancer. Many mutations can be traced to specific types of damage to the DNA, while others arise from DNA replication errors or unknown causes. Technologies are being refined to determine the origins of these mutations, and monitor the accuracy and reproducibility of cancer genomic data. Biological and structural analyses can assess which mutations are functionally relevant. Specific mutations can confer vulnerabilities, making individual cancers more responsive to treatment with DNA damaging agents.

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Mar
23
to Mar 27

Chromatin Architecture and Chromosome Organization, Whistler, BC, USA

  • Whistler Conference Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Understanding the principles governing genome regulation is one of the major challenges now facing biomedical research in the 21st century. Deciphering structure-activity relationships of the genome and its partners in the context of the cell nucleus is a necessary step for understanding the basis of development and disease, as well as for the elaboration of strategies against particular forms of cancers and genetic disorders. The genome is not a linear molecule of DNA randomly distributed in the nucleus, but exists as a three-dimensional (3D) object, intricately folded and packaged, structured around nuclear bodies and landmarks, acted upon by countless force-generating nano-machines and remodeling factors. With the recent advances that have been made in microscopy, biochemistry and modeling, the time is ripe to fully address the study of the genome in 3D space and time and consider it as a complex, dynamic biological system. Up until recently, many of the scientists involved in chromatin biology and epigenetics would attend meetings dedicated to this topic and would not necessarily interface with scientists using advanced imaging or physical and mathematical modeling approaches. This meeting will bring together some of the world’s leading experts and emerging talents at the interface of these topics to explore chromosome architecture and its dynamic relationship with genome function. Specifically, it will explore: 1) Chromatin structure and how this relates to gene expression and genome functions such as DNA replication and repair; 2) Chromosome conformation and the new insights into genome organization that have emerged using new technologies; 3) The nature of the chromatin partners (proteins, RNAs) that underlie chromatin folding and functions and their dynamic relationships in different contexts (cell cycle, development, environmentally induced changes, etc.); 4) Emerging imaging technologies and microscopy and the answers they are bringing to the dynamics of chromatin and chromosome architecture; and 5) New physical and mathematical modeling approaches to further our understanding of the principles governing chromatin architecture.

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Mar
12
to Mar 14

Radiation Break-through: from DNA damage responses to precision cancer therapy, Oxford, UK

This is the second EACR conference focused on this topic. It is designed to be of interest to cancer scientists and medical oncologists with expertise in basic, translational and clinical research. Its objective is to cover recent and exciting developments in the field that are crucial to our understanding of the multifaceted role of the DNA damage response and associated tumour cell specific alterations in cancer initiation, progression and precision cancer therapy.

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Mar
6
1:15 PM13:15

London Cell Cycle Club meeting, London, UK

The London Cell Cycle Club provides a venue for labs doing fundamental cell cycle research in model organisms to interact with those using mammalian cells to drive research in a more ‘translational’ direction.
In addition, the meeting provides a forum of expertise in cell cycle biology to critique new work, enabling new ideas to be ‘distilled’ prior to publication.

Our aims

  • Encourage discussion in a relaxed atmosphere
  • Provide an opportunity for students and post-docs to present new and unpublished data
  • Inspire new collaborations within the UK and European cell cycle field
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Mar
5
to Mar 8

Genomic Instability and Gene Therapeutics in Neurological Diseases, Cancun, Mexico

With the rapidly emerging new tools including genomics, bioinformatics, metabolomics and proteomic analysis and new powerful editing tools such as CRISPR/CAS9 we are getting closer to more defined understanding of the complex cellular pathways underpinning neurodegeneration, which underlie many debilitating pathological and age-associated neurological demise. This is a great opportunity to assemble a rich programme of international speakers to address the latest advances from basic research to clinical applications in disorders of the central nervous system.

The conference will primarily focus on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Alzheimer’s disease/dementia, and repeat expansion disorders with translational spin focussing on recent advances in gene based-therapeutics.

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Feb
11
to Feb 15

3rd DNA Replication/Repair Structures and Cancer Conference, Cancun, Mexico

  • Fiesta Americana Condesa (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The remarkable stability of the human genome is lost in cancer cells due to the loss of efficient and accurate repair in the context of oncogene-induced replication stress and elevated transcription. DNA replication is furthermore emerging as a surprisingly fragile and complex process requiring fork protection and restart, R-loop resolution, and repair. Unresolved replication and repair intermediates signal apoptosis. The synthetic lethality and essentiality resulting from replication-repair stresses thus suggest repair inhibitors as tools to control pathway selection and damage outcomes and to design advanced therapeutics. The 2018 DNA Replication and Repair Structures & Cancer conference will focus on structural and mechanistic insights into dynamic protein, DNA and RNA complexes acting in DNA replication and repair events relevant to cancer.

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